BEYOND THE PCH: THE ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Principally on websites here and there are my immodest provocative political and planning perspectives of Malibu, and sometimes beyond. But also are my arts and entertainment observed, previews and reviews of my abiding love of the cultural scene, in Los Angles and beyond.

These of course include the conventional, mainstream productions, featured at the Music Center downtown. Upcoming by the city’s venerable Center Theatre Group is “ Linda Vista,”  a new play by Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning Tracy Letts, a post #MeToo adult tragic comedy about middle age life crisis.  It opens at the Taper January 16 and runs to Feb. 17, and promises to be an entertaining must see, and worth the drive from Malibu.

For something a little closer and challenging, upcoming at what I consider our local museum, the Getty. for one night only, Saturday the 12th, is artisdt, musician Lonnie Holley.

He will be performing his singular improvisational compositions inspired by his Southern roots, that blossomed into his drawing, painting, sculpture, photograph, stage presence and sound.  Expect the unexpected. It’s free, but you’ll needs tickets, so call ahead: getty.edu/360.

You might consider going early and making a day at the Getty, where there are several excellent exhibits at present.  Quite evocative is the haunting photographs of Sally Mann, which is on display until February 10. Explored is her native South, her family, and a landscape rich in history,

Also on display is a fascinating exhibit exploring the evolution of The Renaissance Nude.  When reviewing it when it opened, I hailed it as one of more engaging art histories in recent years. It runs until January 27.  

If you schedule seeing it on the 12th, and your timing is right and you’ve called ahead for tickets, there is a lecture at 4  PM  on how the nude was viewed in the Renaissance, enhancing religious devotion or desire.  This will give you a little time before the evening concert to catch a bite in the reasonably priced and comfortable self-service café, as I do.

And if you are into nudes, there is a conference at the Getty that next day, Sunday, the 13th, beginning at 10 AM running until 5 PM, of a gathering of scholars discussing  the various attitudes in different cultures to the art form. Entitled The Nude in the Pre-Modern World, 1400 -1700, it is open to all.  Clothing optional?  

And for something really different, is the renown actress Isabella Rossellini and her dog, Pan, in the heralded “Link Link Circus,” at the Broad Stage in very accessible Santa Monica.

Assisted by a puppeteer and animal handler, and incorporating home movies and animation, the unconventional production runs Jan. 25 through the 27th.

My alma mater The New York Times called the show “surrealist humor.”  That, and featuring a dog, makes it a must for me to see.  I suspect it will also for others, and suggest you might want to get tickets earlier.  No service dogs, please.

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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