PT. DUNE SCHOOL PLANS QUESTIONED

A seemingly sincere Santa Monica Malibu Unified School District and a cadre of its consultants descended on Pt. Dume several day ago for a public meeting to review a draft environmental impact report for its proposed ambitious realignment of Malibu schools.

A sparse audience of about 20 Point residents and parents heard that though the report raised some hackles, it was nevertheless needed to expedite the project that will combine the Pt. Dume and Cabrillo elementary schools on the Pt. Dume campus; in the first phase in temporary prefabs and a second stage in a new classroom building

As I comment on public radio 99.1, KBUU, and select websites, the audience had to be wary, given the Santa Monica dominated district board’s long history of short changing Malibu schools. And this despite the real estate rich seacoast city’s disproportionately subsiding the district’s budget to the tune of millions annually.

In summarizing the dense 700 page plus report of mostly boilerplate bureaucratic blather, the district contingent sought to minimize concerns. In particular, these included the traffic impact on local streets and the siting of a two story, 28 foot high, bulky classroom building fronting Grayfox street.

There also was an impassioned call immodestly by me wearing my proud Pt. Dume parent hat for the flexible design of a community school with a progressive curriculum, to serve adults and seniors as well as students, and lend the Point a prominent public presence.

The consultants tried to assure the gathering that the traffic generated by the school doubling its capacity to nearly 400 students can be managed by tweaking commuter patterns. Good luck to that.

As for the indicated siting of the permanent classrooms, district spoke persons said that was just a so-called place holder to expedite the approval process in the project’s first phase, and that the eventual design process in the project’s second phase would include broad public input. And good luck to that, too.

It also should be noted that designating a place holder is a violation of state planning laws, but the district stumbles on.

To be sure, there is little question that in principle that the Malibu school alignment project is needed, as is the pending passage of Measure M to fund it. Malibu schools are a half century old and outdated.

Certainly it will enhance the city’s image and desirability, and while most importantly serving its children and democracy’s paragon of pubic education. And as a bonus it can be expected to boost real estate prices.

It also should prompt the inevitable, and I feel imperative, school district divorce allowing Malibu to establish an independent district, hopefully without paying an exorbitant and unjust ransom.

 

 

 

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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