PT.DUME PARKING FIASCO; WILL THE CITY EVER LEARN?

So the supposedly solvent, financially canny, city of Malibu, to get a relatively modest $2 million from the MTA, needed to complete the $42 million plus purchase of three prominent parcels, has agreed to the questionable construction of a two acre park-and-ride lot at the entry to Point Dume.

There are so many things wrong about that decision: Unwise, not needed, and lazy are a few words that come to mind, though I feel sadly it is typical of a small town-and-minded Malibu, as I comment on public radio 99.1 KBUU and select websites.

If it is any comfort, other cities across the country also are reported beset, our tenets of democracy everywhere facing a mounting wave of ignorance and incompetence.

And in Malibu, further burdened with a part time pampered and uninvolved population, so much for the promised “robust and transparent” discussion. That was to be pursued by the city with the community over the public use of the parcel at PCH and Heathercliff, known as the Christmas Tree lot.

What we can say is that if the city has its thumb in the pie it typically will yield design prerogatives to obsequious consultants and uncaring staff, whomever, with the probable result the egress and access of the lot will be eyesores, the landscaping poorly designed and planted, and the environmentally sensitive gulley there threatened.

To the backburner unfortunately goes my persistent hope for attractive, landscaped, affordable, planned unit development, sponsored by a local, morally motivated non profit consortium, not big government, to serve those who serve us.

We are not proposing stereotypical low income housing for a potential criminal element, as had been claimed by a few neighbors who should know better. We are talking local teachers and fireman here, maybe even a city employee, though frankly it would be nice to hear from them.

Meanwhile, a bloated bureaucracy and neophyte council again out of ignorance and laziness, or whatever, have compromised the public face and planning potential of the sadly fading rural seacoast village character of Malibu.

Don’t want to sound too dramatic, but these seemingly minor decisions affecting a few acres here and there, a parking lot, a structured garage, arbitrarily and most time behind closed doors, are what really shape our aesthetic experience, and pride in, and value of, our city.

It is an old, and true, adage that cities are shaped not by pricey master plans, but by one project at a time.

And incidentally, the $2 million the city said it needed to close the deal is about what Malibu has paid our State consultant California Strategies, for the last decade, and still now, apparently just to glad hand our councilpersons and city staff when boondoggling in Sacramento.

Certainly it does not seem to have gone to influence the MRCA, Coastal Commission, or MTA. As a former strategic planning consultant to MTA, I’m confident the agency would have been more accommodating, if the parties involved displayed more concern for the community and not just for the money. And the paper shuffling.

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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