GREEK TRAGEDY AT GETTY VILLA

It’s September, the traditional launch time for the cultural calendar year , and in an ever challenging L.A. that means a diversity of offerings celebrating what’s new in dance, music, theatre and the visual arts.
 
And increasing it is, making it harder and harder to chose a weekly venue to attend, just as it is harder and harder to get to it on time, given the crush of traffic in the L.A. metropolitan area, especially if you live in Malibu, as I do.
 
So as I comment on public radio 99.1 KBU and select websites. this weekend I chose something convenient, a theatrical performance, at the Getty Villa in Malibu premiering last night. But to say the least it was not something new by any measure of calendar. Indeed, it was ancient, and if you can trust Wikipedia was first performed in 405 B.C.
 
It was the Greek tragedy by the Athenian playwright Euripides, scripted in his final years while living in Macedonia. Entitled ‘The Bacchae,” it is considered a capstone to his career, winning first prize in a festival drama competition held in the City of Dionysia 2523 years ago.
 
Personally, when I think of it, that addendum of information just astounds me.
 
The play follows the revengeful ruses of the god of wine and madness, and not incidentally fertility, Dionysus, as he return to his birthplace in Greece. As described by the Getty, the play is “packed with striking scenes, frenzied emotion, and choral songs of great power and beauty.”
 
And where better to see it than at the Getty Villa sitting under a dark sky in an open Roman styled amphitheater. If you love theatre, history ad histrionics, you going to love the production, directed by Anne Bogart.
 
It runs Thursday, Friday or Saturday evening, for the next two weekends, closing on the 29th. As for my review, that will be next week.
 
If you live in Malibu and are culturally curious, as I am, but ever wary of PCH traffic and the want something even closer than the Getty Villa, opened this week is a Pop art exhibit at the Weisman Museum at Pepperdine. It runs until December 2.
 
With some 50 pieces including some by Claes Oldenburg and Keith Haring, curated by Billie Milam Weisman herself, the exhibit promises to be top-tier. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays, and it is free.
 
 

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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