MALIBU CITY SHOULD BUY LAND, BUT OVERSIGHT NEEDED

There is no news like local news. So because my local followers expect no less, I dutifully cut my hiatus a little short to comment on public radio KBU and select websites on a pending item before the Malibu City Council, to consider pursuing the purchase of three parcels of land I feel critical to the future of the city.
 
The parcels are the nearly ten acres at the prominent corner of Stuart Ranch Road at Civic Center Way, commonly identified as the Chili Cook Off site; and the lot at the corner of PCH at Webb Way, where the construction equipment for the sewer project is now parked.
 
The third site is the vacant 18 plus acres at the entry to Point Dume at Heathercliff, where the Christmas trees are sold annually. Owned at present by the Perrenchio estate, the parcels are zoned commercial and carry the total price tag $42.5 million, which is considered a bargain.
 
If planned, designed and developed with a true civic purpose, I feel they have the potential to lend focus, maybe a point of pride or two, to the 21 meandering miles of Malibu.
 
Indeed, if selectively and sensitively landscaped for needed recreational facilities, at last a ball field or two, even a skateboard park and a swimming pool, it could take the pressure off the proposed misguided compromising of Bluffs Park. And also solve that political conundrum.
 
Yes, these may be fantasies, certainly for my skeptical self, especially given our bumbling local government, whether it can purchase the properties without a hitch and hidden conditions. and then boldly initiate some imaginative planning effort.
 
Its track record is not very good. I note still languishing is the development to somehow justify the purchase of the 35 acre Trancas Field, for something, a community garden, a wildlife sanctuary, a tree farm, whatever. And that is even when the work is outsourced by City Hall, as it usually is when thorny.
 
All one has to do is look how our city government over the years trashed the not so civic center. I consider that fractured collection of commercial conceits a design disaster, at best geared to tourists, a badly landscaped roof of a pricey water treatment plant serving real estate interests, and for residents, an uninviting city hall and library.
 
The there is our past and present fumbling neophyte city councils, however congenial and collegial, naively relying on a self serving city staff. Talk about the blind leading the blind,
 
Still, I feel the purchase must be pursued, and hope enough residents care to pay attention and steer City Hall in the right direction. Certainly some citizen oversight is needed.
 
But these parcels must not fall into the hands of private developers.
 
In real estate if you want the land and the price seems right, and you are not sure how you’re going to get the monies needed, you go for it any way,, and trust the figures are going to work, eventually.
 
At least that’s my opinion, having professionally pursued development in the jungles of New York City in the distant past, and personally in Malibu where we fortunately said yes, decades ago and could not afford to do so today.
 
The city should do the same.
 
 

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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