A REVIEW AND PREVIEW

Wishing in a whisper a very happy centennial birthday to Leonard Bernstein, I listened last week with pure pleasure to his tonal distinctive overture to “Candide.”

As I comment on public radio 99.1 KBU and select websites, the operetta, show musical, call it what you will, Candide is in its last weeks to a most successful revival at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center downtown.

\Indeed, the musical has been through several revivals in the half century since it initially flopped on Broadway in 1956, despite Bernstein already then being hailed as a young genius. It certainly didn’t faze his Music and Art High school fan club fan I hung with at the time back in New York City.

And sixty years later I frankly was not going to be fazed by the flaws in the story line that has been rewritten countless times, and is based on a comic novella by the philosopher Voltaire recounting a youth’s tribulations as he optimistically searches for “the best of all possible worlds.” The flaws persist.

But to my delight, and apparently the audiences’, the music survives and succeeds, with thanks to a cast of opera singers, and two show biz veterans, Kelsey Grammar and Christine Ebersole and a shout out here to sound designer Kai Harada, set designer James Noone, and conductor James Conlon

I also was relieved, for I heralded the production in advance of its opening and in anticipation that it would be a hot ticket.

This may be off course for a critic, but I feel does perhaps better serves my audience, especially when pressed by a tight calendar. That’s why I occasionally trumpet productions or exhibits I have not seen yet, though am reasonably confident of their being noteworthy.

So, with that in mind and alert to a limited two week engagement, tonight through Sunday March 11th, I am giving a heads up to “The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk, “ at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, in Beverly Hills.

It is a love story of the artist Marc Chagall and his wife Bella, a two character play that promises to be a most engaging production by Bristol, England’s Old Vic and the always inventive Kneehigh troupe.

According to the advance hype, it should dazzle, combining the visuals of Chagall’s paintings with the music and dance of the Russian-Jewish tradition. Talk about a theatrical bowl of borscht. My soul awaits.

 

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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