CALMING MALIBU TRAFFIC: YEA AND NAY

By the end of the meeting this to discuss a traffic management plan for Pt. Dume, it was a shout out , yea or nay, to a list of proposed mitigations.

So much for vetting a majority of affected residents on targeted projects, as the city is prone to do even on safety measures when there is a hint of controversy. Like most governmental structures, the usual mantra is when in doubt, don’t.

But Malibu’s skittish City Council and servile staff was very on stage recently, in walking distance to my home, and therefore convenient grist once again for my weekly City Observed commentary, heard on 97.5 KBU and everywhere on radiomalibu.net. and select websites.

For the record, speed humps received a slightly louder yea than nay, despite a battalion chief saying the Fire Department was opposed to them; they slow response time.

Also receiving yeas were radar speed signs where speeding seems to occur, particularly on Dune Drive, and measures to make Heathercliff safer for pedestrian darting back and forth between the shopping center and the post office.

Not asked by city manager Jim Thorsen for any indication, yea or nay, was the recommendation shown on a plan for encroachments on all street on the Point to accommodate pedestrians and parking. Talk about municipal minefields

This would have opened the way to the city requesting and possibly ordering property owners to remove landscaping, trees, fences and mailbox now in the city’s legal right-of–way, edging streets. Though the devil is in the details, the issue involving who pays for it and maintains it, was avoided by an adroit Thorsen.

Receiving the loudest approval was Thorsen stating that the parking problem on Grasswood would be addressed by simply striping the roadway edges. This would allow the ticketing of cars encroaching into the street path that had made traffic all but impassable, especially for emergency vehicles.

Grasswood residents have been particularly adamant since this concern was raised more than a year ago and at subsequent meetings of the city’s public safety commission. This eventually prompted the Council to hold a hearing on the Point last Fall, addressing not only the situation on Grasswood but all community traffic issues, speeding as well as parking.

That meeting in turn spurred the city to take yet another look at a traffic management plan for the Point. More work for consultants and staff, and more time before anything just might be done to open Grasswood for emergency vehicles, especially on beach days.

So it was not surprising that at the meeting this week sprinkled in the audience of about 50 were many persevering Grasswood residents, confirming the truism that if a councilperson does not live on your street, the squeaky wheel will get the oil.

The squeak got louder as Thorsen fielded questions, which had followed a review by a Kimley Horn consultant of the city’s latest iteration of a traffic study the firm did for the Point 14 years ago. From the cheap seats in the back could be heard the Nike refrain, “just do it.”

As for next steps, Thorsen said the recommendations needed to go back to the City Council, and that if approved expeditiously, the mitigations hopefully could be implement before the Summer, and before he left office at the end of May.

The countdown has begun.

 

Published by

hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *