CALMING MALIBU TRAFFIC: YEA AND NAY

By the end of the meeting this to discuss a traffic management plan for Pt. Dume, it was a shout out , yea or nay, to a list of proposed mitigations.

So much for vetting a majority of affected residents on targeted projects, as the city is prone to do even on safety measures when there is a hint of controversy. Like most governmental structures, the usual mantra is when in doubt, don’t.

But Malibu’s skittish City Council and servile staff was very on stage recently, in walking distance to my home, and therefore convenient grist once again for my weekly City Observed commentary, heard on 97.5 KBU and everywhere on radiomalibu.net. and select websites.

For the record, speed humps received a slightly louder yea than nay, despite a battalion chief saying the Fire Department was opposed to them; they slow response time.

Also receiving yeas were radar speed signs where speeding seems to occur, particularly on Dune Drive, and measures to make Heathercliff safer for pedestrian darting back and forth between the shopping center and the post office.

Not asked by city manager Jim Thorsen for any indication, yea or nay, was the recommendation shown on a plan for encroachments on all street on the Point to accommodate pedestrians and parking. Talk about municipal minefields

This would have opened the way to the city requesting and possibly ordering property owners to remove landscaping, trees, fences and mailbox now in the city’s legal right-of–way, edging streets. Though the devil is in the details, the issue involving who pays for it and maintains it, was avoided by an adroit Thorsen.

Receiving the loudest approval was Thorsen stating that the parking problem on Grasswood would be addressed by simply striping the roadway edges. This would allow the ticketing of cars encroaching into the street path that had made traffic all but impassable, especially for emergency vehicles.

Grasswood residents have been particularly adamant since this concern was raised more than a year ago and at subsequent meetings of the city’s public safety commission. This eventually prompted the Council to hold a hearing on the Point last Fall, addressing not only the situation on Grasswood but all community traffic issues, speeding as well as parking.

That meeting in turn spurred the city to take yet another look at a traffic management plan for the Point. More work for consultants and staff, and more time before anything just might be done to open Grasswood for emergency vehicles, especially on beach days.

So it was not surprising that at the meeting this week sprinkled in the audience of about 50 were many persevering Grasswood residents, confirming the truism that if a councilperson does not live on your street, the squeaky wheel will get the oil.

The squeak got louder as Thorsen fielded questions, which had followed a review by a Kimley Horn consultant of the city’s latest iteration of a traffic study the firm did for the Point 14 years ago. From the cheap seats in the back could be heard the Nike refrain, “just do it.”

As for next steps, Thorsen said the recommendations needed to go back to the City Council, and that if approved expeditiously, the mitigations hopefully could be implement before the Summer, and before he left office at the end of May.

The countdown has begun.

 

TRYING TO CATCH THE TRAIN , FROM MALIBU!

 

We love living in Malibu, but as most residents hate commuting, especially on the accident prone Pacific Coast Highway. It is the bane of the city, as I declare in my latest commentary, on 97.5 KBU FM, radiomalibu.net, and cityobserved.com.

And whatever constraints we might impose on questionable commercial development to discourage traffic on the PCH, it can be expected to get worse.

On a more personal note, the isolation is particularly vexing considering the frustration driving just to spend some time in a burgeoning Santa Monica, or in an increasingly engaging downtown L.A. And add to that the headache of parking.

With the crazed traffic situation almost everywhere in mind, it is interesting to note that as a service to its residents West Hollywood is launching a free, peak-hour bus shuttle linking select stops in its city to the expanding Metro rail service.

Meanwhile, also soon to be launched this Spring is Phase 2 of the Expo Line extending light rail service from the current terminus in Culver City to Santa Monica, with 7 new stations serving the Westside. The result will be to put downtown Los Angeles 46 minute away from downtown Santa Monica.

Nice, if you happen to live in easy walking distance to a station. Not nice if you happen to live miles away, like in Malibu.

Residents there wanting to take the train will still have to drive to Santa Monica on the dreaded PCH, and then search for a parking space near the Expo station.

But no new parking is planned at the Expo terminus at 4th and Colorado, and only a ridiculous few 70 spaces available at the 17th Street station.

Yes, there is the lumbering 534 bus, though it is notoriously slow and makes many stops.

Perhaps if the service could be better organized –lets call it the 534X- to offer express buses at convenient times to and from the Expo terminus to select stops in the Bu, say Trancas, the Point, and the Civic Center, where commuter parking could be provided.

Certainly this it would be an incentive not to drive the PCH, especially for venues downtown.

A variation to get into Santa Monica with a minimum of driving and the headache of parking would be to offer commuter parking weekdays at, say, Will Rogers Beach, and provide a shuttle to the rail terminus.

As an added incentive. the service could be free, as in West Hollywood, or charge a nominal amount, say $1, with extended hours to serve the returning late night crowds.

A shuttle service featuring something akin to a jitney buses could be particularly attractive, and could be decorated to be very Malibu.

Such a service if managed with common sense and civility , I feel, has the potential of reducing traffic on the PCH and also giving more easy access to downtown.

As for cost, I’m confident that there are funds available for a pilot program from government sources, such as the MTA, and for private ticket tie-ins.

It’s certainly worth considering.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Lament for the Bank of Books, and Books

Sad news for Malibu and in particular my neighborhood of Point Dume: our only bookstore, the Bank of Books, is closing its doors this spring, as I lament in my latest commentary on 97.5 KBU and radiomalibu.net., and in print here.

Despite a host of well-attended and publicized readings, congenial signings and outdoor seating in an amiable setting, its sales apparently have stagnated in the four years it had persevered in the cozy Point Dume Plaza. I for one will miss it.

No doubt E books, Amazon and discount stores have taken their toll.   To be sure, E books are attractive; they certainly don’t take up much room, and audio books I feel can ease the pain of long commutes we in Malibu must endure..

But I frankly love books, the printed kind, on sheets of paper, in type face of varied styles, bound together within covers, of evocative designs hinting at the works of fiction or non fiction within, and the worlds of ideas, emotion and histoy

Books for me have been a constant companion, comfort and challenge; from the day I got a library card in a burgeoning Brooklyn of the past. There libraries were something akin to an ecumenical house of worship, a hushed community center, and for a large family living in cramped apartments, our living room.

As a student, a reader and especially as a critic, I have been over the years accumulating thousands of books, literally a ton of them, conscientiously trucking them with me as I moved from place to place, city to city. I might leave a piece of furniture behind, but never a box of books.

Occasionally prodded by largess or lack of space, I have parted with a few from time to time, donating them to schools and libraries, and giving them to those I know would appreciate them. Books for me have always been the gift of choice.

Still books are everywhere in my house: in almost every room, walls of packed shelves from floor to ceiling, piled on tables and stacked in corners, roughly sorted by authors and subjects. And then there is the singular shelves with books I have written, all four of them, and those of my friends and family.

Most prominent these day is a thin, searing book of poetry entitled Poem Without Suffering (Wonder Books), written by my middle son, Josef Hall Kaplan. I immodestly note with pride that it has risen to Eighth nationally on the poetry best seller list of small publishers, and number One in our home.

 

 

 

Malibu Ponders Civic Center Mess

Is there any hope for Malibu’s Civic Center

Of course, to call a scattered city hall and library, a user-unfriendly earthen roof of a water treatment plant. labeled a park, and four disconnected suburban shopping malls, soon to be six, a civic center is a misnomer. It is frankly a mess.

And what it says about the city’s planning efforts and political acumen to date is less flattering.

It is indeed an embarrassing screw up, big time in a little city flaunting its singular natural beauty, and so I declare in my latest commentary for KBU, radiomalibu.net and select websites.

Let’s just label it municipal mismanagement, and not the most meritorious item on the resumes of departing city manager Jim Thorsen and soon to be termed out council members.

This is not to say they haven’t learned from their mistakes, and from the message sent to them by 60 per cent of the citizenry in the recent city referendums, whatever the legal fate of Measure R that wrenched from them the power to approve or disapprove select commercial developments.

To add a positive note, there is very much an opportunity for the city to correct some of these mistakes, and plan an appealing civic center that meets the true needs of Malibu and not the conceits of commercial interests.

That opportunity is in a fresh approach to what is known in government as a Specific Plan, and was the conclusion of a recent joint meeting of the City Council and Planning Commission and their entourages..

They had met ostensibly to review the status of the Civic Center Design Standards study, which a gaggle of select residents led by a conscientious consultant team have been pursuing for the last two years while the battle over Measures R and W raged.

However, in its quest for a quote “walk able coastal village with rural characteristics “unquote, the study exceeded the usual scope of design standards by including the need for a traffic and pedestrian circulation plan, mixed uses, and senior and local work force housing.

These are elements generally addressed in a Specific Plan, and call for land use changes that involve zoning amendments, consistent with the city’s general and coastal plans.

That in turn would most likely need voter approval, and in essence would lend residents actually broader and more positive powers than what they had sought in Measure R. That would be ironic.

It also would be a triumph of hope over experience, the city having failed in several past attempts at crafting specific plans.

Nevertheless, the Council and Commission were enthusiastic that the city moves toward drafting the plan, but were not sure how to do it.

Noted was the problem how the general public can be more involved, and in turn become the needed advocates for a new plan, especially in light of its distrust of the city stemming from the battles to date over the civic center.

The poor turnout for the joint meeting was not encouraging. The city’s lack of transparency and outreach has not helped.

No motion was considered, as the staff was directed to somehow facilitate the study needed for a specific plan, preferably with resident participation.

The well compensated consultant team seemed enthused. It remains to be seen if residents will be.