If Words Were Water; Pronouncements Viable Projects…

If words were water the Los Angeles River would be overflowing its banks; if pronouncements were viable projects, a very green sustainable Southern California is in the offing.
 
There certainly were a lot of words and pronouncements at the recent industry heralded “FutureBuild” convocation in Los Angeles, staged by the venerable VerdeXchange with the Urban Land Institute.
 
Attending were an estimated 700 persons so-called marketmakers, including a large design and development crowd. This prompted me to put on my commentator’s hat to do blogs for the cityobserved.com, and the Architect’s Newspaper, http://blog.archpaper.com/2016/01/going-green-ulis-verdexchange, and broadcasts for KBU. FM and radiomalibu.net.
 
Of major interest was a keynote session entitled “A River Runs Through It: Reimagining L.A.’s Water Way,” with opening remarks by the city’s personable Mayor Eric Garcetti, to be followed by a widely promoted panel prominently featuring celebrity architect Frank Gehry.
 
Garcetti was his smooth self, reviewing the rise and fall of the river’s prominence through the city’s history, touting its present planned revitalization by a concerted community effort, and its critical importance to the future of the city. It was a variation on a speech the mayor has been delivering for several years,
 
However, it did not assuage the announcement that Gehry had bowed out at the last moment. His appearance had been anticipated as an opportunity for him to reply to the skepticism surrounding his appointment by the mayor’s L.A. River Revitalization Corp. to master plan the 51 mile waterway.
 
Instead of being viewed as a second coming, the selection roiled river advocates who had been involved in various long term and long suffering efforts, marked by team planning and transparency. They charged that Gehry with little landscape experience has come late to the party, attracted by the publicity it is generating and a $1.4 billion price tag.
 
Gehry has been sharply dismissive of any criticism, while his fans including the mayor and his minions have been hinting at the architect generating concepts that will catapult the city to prominence and also enhance its bid for the 2024 Olympics.
 
They will have to wait a little longer, according to Tensho Takemori, Gehry’s surrogate, who said the office was still gathering information while working on a 3 D model of the river. “We are not holding our breaths,” commented architect Gerhard Mayer.
 
Indeed, in addition to the one on the L.A. River, the sessions covering every shade of the rising “green” consciousness, from energy to infrastructure, were mostly standing room only. Said an architect trading candor for anonymity, “we’re here not for Frank, nor really for the presentations, but for the networking.”
 
Green is hot. That’s good.
 
 

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hallkaplan

Parallel careers as an urban planner and a journalist, principally at present airing commentaries on pubic radio 99.1 KBU.FM The many arrows in my quiver have included Emmy award winning reporter/ producer for local Fox Television News, design critic for the Los Angeles Times, urban affairs reporter for The New York Times, an editor of The New York Post, contributor to various popular and professional publications, news services and broadcast outlets, including Reuters, NET, NBC, CBS, NPR and the BBC. Founding editor of the East Harlem (NY) Independent. A diversity of professional positions and consultancies in the private and public sectors, (Metro, Disney Imagineering, Howard Hughes, M. Milken, NYC Educational Construction Fund, US Comptroller of the Currency etc,) assorted academic appointments (UCLA, USC, CCNY, Art Center etc.), and always open to new challenge. And let us not forget fashioning sand castles and acting on 90210, crafting TV docs, design reviews, master plans. Books: "The Dream Deferred: People, Politics and Planning in Suburbia," "L.A. Lost and Found," an architectural history of Los Angeles, "L.A. Follies," a collection of essays, and co-author of "The New York City Handbook." Writings have appeared in academic texts, commentaries on the web, scripts for TV, and wherever, latest the Architects Newspaper, The Planning Report and Planetizen.

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